Next evolution in game design?



  • Hi allies.

    I was watching a friend play Uncharted 4 and came to the realization that graphics in games are "done". What I mean by that is, there will never be point in time when someone can say: "Uncharted 4? That looks awful now", no matter how good graphical fidelity will eventually get. So my question is, what is the next area in game development you would like to see devs focus on?

    For example I have always dreamed about GTA that is like 1/3 of the size of GTA V, has similar graphics but you can access ALL of the buildings.

    So what is your vision of the future? Bigger worlds? Denser worlds? More NPCs? More Dialog? Or indeed, even better graphics?


  • Banned

    I don't think there will ever be a point in time where graphics are done.

    But the next logical step would be for them to focus more on interactivity with your environment.



  • I doubt that there will never be more space for improvement. But if all the work, that would otherwise had to be put towards graphics, could be directed to anything else, it wold probably be expanding the world and story and the way you can change/manipulate them.



  • Bloodborne 2:

    This time with 60fps

    that's all this industry needs

    No, really. I'm serious.



  • @Michster Dark Souls 3 on a PC is the closest we've got. After playing the PC version, console DS3 becomes unplayable.

    60 fps console games is the next big thing I'm waiting or at least an option for the people who want to sacrifice graphical fidelity for framerate.



  • @TheHorsecockexpress said in Next evolution in game design?:

    @Michster Dark Souls 3 on a PC is the closest we've got. After playing the PC version, console DS3 becomes unplayable.

    60 fps console games is the next big thing I'm waiting or at least an option for the people who want to sacrifice graphical fidelity for framerate.

    I never really cared about 60fps UNTIL Dark Souls 3. After beating it, going back and playing DS1, it's like wading in mud. Now I HAVE to have 60fps.

    Back on topic, in terms of the future, I would love to see big improvements in making user generated content even easier to create. What people can do now is amazing compared to just a decade ago, I can't imagine what things will be like a decade from now.



  • The biggest thing for me is AI. Having "dumb" AI breaks immersion so quickly, I can't count the number of times a broken companion stuck on a table in Fallout has completely killed the mood. I'd love to have something that makes me question whether I'm playing with someone else or AI, but I don't think we're there... yet.



  • I am absolutely certain there will be a point in time when Uncharted 4 won't be considered the bee's graphically superior knees. Hell, I can see that happening in the next 5 years to be honest.

    VR and interactivity are the next logical step in my opinion. I watched a video where somebody had rigged HL2 to have independent hand movement in VR, which meant they could do stuff like shoot to the side while running or toss grenades over their shoulder.
    Please take a minute to think about how amazing that is.

    Also, physics. Stuff like soft body physics for buildings and structures. The new Breakdown looks like a good step in that direction.



  • VERTICALITY

    But seriously, I don't think graphics are anywhere near done. It's clear that we've come a really long way, but gaming graphics aren't actually realistic, they just seem that way in contrast with how they used to be. Someday, they'll have the fidelity of modern movie CG, and then movie CG will look even better (though obviously we are in the era of diminishing returns).

    But I think, even more than graphics, it's about collision. You look at For Honor and it's a really good-looking game, but the guy swings his axe and part of it clips through the enemy and there's a red spray meant to indicate blood. Your actual 3D model doesn't change as you take damage in accordance with the damage (what hit you, where it hit you, at what angle, etc.), and there's no actual physics models based on this one thing hitting this other thing. Rag-doll is a super primitive implementation of this and it's hardly accurate. Your computer doesn't have the power, and the programmers just don't have the time.

    But once games start doing that stuff...that's it.



  • @El-Shmiablo The point is, Ucharted 4 will never become the "Bubsy 3D" which looks like total shit. No matter how good animation will become, movies like Frozen will look "good" forever. Crysis may still be the best looking game.

    @GMan I would argue that modern games already look way better than movie CGI. Also, photorealistic graphics in the future don't mean that Unchated 4 suddenly becomes "ugly" looking game. It simply becomes not the best looking. I doubt there will ever be as big of a visual upgrade as switching from SD -> HD.



  • I feel like pretty soon we're gonna reach a time where art style becomes much more important because people have had their fill with 'realistic graphics'. And soon we'll see it become a race to see who's game can look the most like their concept art.



  • @michemagius said in Next evolution in game design?:

    I feel like pretty soon we're gonna reach a time where art style becomes much more important because people have had their fill with 'realistic graphics'. And soon we'll see it become a race to see who's game can look the most like their concept art.

    If a developer could make their game look like a Craig Mullins painting I would literally explode from the hype.



  • @TheHorsecockexpress Started on pc for the best experience, played through on ps4 becuz trophies. Action games need that 60fps yup. Imagine devil may cry 5 being announced as ps4-exclusive with 30fps



  • @TheHorsecockexpress Uncharted will never be considered a "Bubsy 3D" because Bubsy 3D looked like shit to begin with, even for it's time period.

    But I can honestly see a point in time, most likely very soon too, when people will say something along the lines of " We used to think this looked good?".

    Also, you are on some serious drugs if you think games come even slightly close to modern movie CGI.



  • @El-Shmiablo said in Next evolution in game design?:

    @TheHorsecockexpress Uncharted will never be considered a "Bubsy 3D" because Bubsy 3D looked like shit to begin with, even for it's time period.

    But I can honestly see a point in time, most likely very soon too, when people will say something along the lines of " We used to think this looked good?".

    Also, you are on some serious drugs if you think games come even slightly close to modern movie CGI.

    Replace "Bubsy 3D" with any PS1 3D game and the result is the same.

    I think "we used to think this looked realistic" is a possibility in the future. Some games have so distinct art styles that more computing power doesn't nessesarily improve their graphical fidelity.

    I must say, I dislike the extremely "fake" look of CGI so much that I'm not qualified to judge it. The bear in the Revenant looked god awful. The best (most believeable) CGI is still The Gollum in The Lord of the Rings. (Mostly because of Andy Serkis AMAZING motion capture)

    And I do like occasionally to do drugs...



  • Graphics will never be truly "done" until we reach the uncanny valley. @Art mentioned it already but a higher focus on interactivity within the environment would be the more logical focal point for the coming generations.

    I'm speaking in a more AI term, for example NPCs would have more reactionary event handling to create a more visceral experience instead of the usual generic lines. This is a bit of a pipedream considering the amount of talent needed to create such an effect but with how much of a focus there is with open world games such behaviours feel archaic going all the way back to the 1980s. The idea that you could converse with some random villager akin to a MUD would be a really interesting test of immersion.



  • The first time I saw screeshots of Halo years ago, I was totally blown away and felt they were totally PHOTOREALISTIC. Just look at the pic below. And I'm not talking about the HD-remake from a couple years back. I'm talking about the original from 2001 (bottom part of the screenshots below).

    Halo

    Three years laters in 2004, I thought the same of Half-Life 2. Just look at those epic graphics ;)

    Half-Life 2

    It's all about putting the graphics into context. Unfortunately everything we see today looks REALLY good but will look shitty a couple of years from now. One thing I see changing (as @michemagius already pointed out) is that we will see a move towards highly stylized games in terms of graphics.

    World of Warcraft took this route years ago with their MMO. Even at the time, the graphics weren't that great. WoW came out in 2004, the same year that Far Cry was released. This game also looked epic at the time and only a few computers could run it at high settings.

    Far Cry vs WoW

    Today, we have games like Overwatch, which look realistic at first glance but when you start looking at the characters and environments, you find out that they are actually heavily stylized and even the animations are often exaggerated for that COOL factor. Just check out how they animate the Victory animations (taken from an Overwatch animation talk at GDC)

    The Animation of Overwatch

    In terms of game design, I am really curious about AI as @Saya mentioned above:

    I'm speaking in a more AI term, for example NPCs would have more reactionary event handling to create a more visceral experience instead of the usual generic lines. This is a bit of a pipedream considering the amount of talent needed to create such an effect but with how much of a focus there is with open world games such behaviours feel archaic going all the way back to the 1980s. The idea that you could converse with some random villager akin to a MUD would be a really interesting test of immersion.

    This is going to be hard to achieve but the gameplay options could be really epic if this is done correctly. One game that is playing with this a bit is Kingdom Come: Deliverance, which the Allies spoke about in their impressions from E3.

    Another very interesting avenue of improvement will most likely be procedural world generation like in We Happy Few and No Man's Sky. We'll see how these games pull it off :)



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    I'm just gonna leave this here.