Paying for content: A review



  • There are a couple other youtube channels I go to from time to time that are supported by Pateron but so far I'm only supporting EZA. The others I go to from time to time are, Kinda Funny Games, Blame Society and Arcade Impossible. I'd probably support them if I watched their stuff more, but the majority of my video watchin went to GT and now EZA so they really earned it from me.



  • @alexwhiteplays Allies like you are what makes this community very special, no matter what monetary contributions one may make. Being here on this forum, watching the shows, giving feedback, all of this is at least as important. Thank you for opening up to us like this.



  • I'm one that doesn't subscribe to any twitch streamers, none. I simply don't have time to watch people on twitch when I'm not personally streaming on twitch.

    EZA changed that, of course it helps that I can watch all their shows on youtube when I'm sitting down to eat with the wife, and because I want them to keep going I went for the patreon thing too, something else I've never done.

    And I'll probably keep going for as long as I can.



  • My review:

    I like Patreon for niche content. It allows for content like Ian Hinck continuing to be the most beautious beauty boi of all time.

    But there's a massive downside to Patreon, imo, and it's that I sometimes feel creators are shackled by Patreon expectations much more than they ever would by YT community commenters or NeoGAF fans or what-have-you. As soon as money is involved, people feel they have a say in what gets created, even if the goals/descriptions of the Patreon campaign are very clearly defined. And it's all well and good, but as soon as something dinky dau happens, like with Bosman and the betting special, people start saying "This isn't what I paid for!" and pull their funding.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is, Patreon is emotional investment tied to financial investment, and that can be super fickle. Already the Patreon has dipped below $40k after first surpassing it, and if EZA wants that studio, it'll need to be steadily above the $45k mark to do so. Once you start having massive physical assets with monthly payments required, you need stability in your funding. This can lead to a stagnation of creativity where creators feel forced to make what people want and not necessarily branch out.

    Now, the Allies are all smart, creative, passionate peoples, so I think they've probably got a good handle on managing expectations, promoting creative risks, etc. But I've seen it happen to other Patreons, and it's the one major downside to the funding methodology.



  • @eschatological said in Paying for content: A review:

    My review:

    I like Patreon for niche content. It allows for content like Ian Hinck continuing to be the most beautious beauty boi of all time.

    But there's a massive downside to Patreon, imo, and it's that I sometimes feel creators are shackled by Patreon expectations much more than they ever would by YT community commenters or NeoGAF fans or what-have-you. As soon as money is involved, people feel they have a say in what gets created, even if the goals/descriptions of the Patreon campaign are very clearly defined. And it's all well and good, but as soon as something dinky dau happens, like with Bosman and the betting special, people start saying "This isn't what I paid for!" and pull their funding.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is, Patreon is emotional investment tied to financial investment, and that can be super fickle. Already the Patreon has dipped below $40k after first surpassing it, and if EZA wants that studio, it'll need to be steadily above the $45k mark to do so. Once you start having massive physical assets with monthly payments required, you need stability in your funding. This can lead to a stagnation of creativity where creators feel forced to make what people want and not necessarily branch out.

    Now, the Allies are all smart, creative, passionate peoples, so I think they've probably got a good handle on managing expectations, promoting creative risks, etc. But I've seen it happen to other Patreons, and it's the one major downside to the funding methodology.

    Problem is, that's how all entertainment media works. If people don't like what you're doing, they stop buying your product. It's the very nature of the business.

    For me, the betting thing was a little obnoxious...I had a giggle cause I expected it, but I don't like trolling as a form of humor, maybe I'm old fashioned.

    But it's just one facet of EZA, I wouldn't stop supporting them unless everyone had some major personality shift that didn't sit right with me.



  • @eschatological
    Good points, I think with all crowd funding you really need to get your expectations in check to avoid being unhappy with how you spent your money. When you fund a game/comic/board game/youtube channel etc. your funding the creative people behind it, not becoming a publishing partner. You have to understand that there are risk involved and that you don't have any creative input in the process unless otherwise dictated (like being part of polls that shape the content). I think if you go in understanding that you aren't pre-ordering a game, show, comic etc. that is going to be to your specifications but that your funding a person or group of people to create something you want to experience or enjoy your less likely to feel slighted if the end product doesn't match your exceptions of how the project would turn out.



  • I've funded a few various things (some games, friends music stuff, etc) and have no problem trying to help people out if I'm interested in what they're working on.

    I'd like to be an EZA patron as well but I need to find a job first



  • Just the trial was worth $25



  • @TheHashtag0nist said in Paying for content: A review:

    Just the trial was worth $25

    I laughed until my voice is now raspy. Worth everything that led to this moment lol.



  • Before i start, I feel like every penny I spend is worth it. I get plenty of entertainment from all the Allies, and have even gotten to watch some twitch when I have some time (prior, only ever used Twitch for e3 coverage and occasional stream myself). If I'm being honest though, for me, a "personalized" email is nice and hearing Brandon say my name is cool, but I feel the community comments video is most bang for my buck lol.

    The allies are the only Patreon I back, but I'm certainly open to others, maybe of the music variety or something..



  • In a day and age where earning money through advertising is becoming less reliable, I'll gladly support creators I like through Patreon. It's pretty much the way independent creators are going - they need to make money to continue to make content, and as a fan, you kinda need to help a bit if you can. It's becoming more of a content-as-a-service type thing. You help each other have good times.