The early days of being an Anime fan



  • @DeweyDTruman I watched the end of the StarS season of Sailor Moon on Youtube that way... I actually did it during my yearbook class in high school.

    Also, I totally had a bootleg collection of Love Hina dvds that I bought from a secondhand electronics store.



  • @logic__error Secondhand electronics stores were (and still are really) a blessing. I didn't think to mention it in my first post but one of my favorites was Yu Yu Hakusho and being able to pick up old DVD sets of it to watch with my brother instead of just having to hope I was up at 6 AM when it aired on CN was a blessing.



  • @DeweyDTruman DBZ and Sailor Moon at 6am gave me a reason to wake up on time during elementary school! I did have to miss the end of episodes in order to catch the bus though.



  • @michemagius I'm glad you shared all that. As a fellow word spewer, birther of walls of text, remember that breaking up sections into smaller paragraphs makes things much, much easier to read even though I admit I'm horrible at organizing my paragraphs and tend to reiterate things I've already said at times by accident.



  • My beginning with anime was the same as it was for every kid in my country, one of the free tv channels in the country had an anime block from 5:00 pm to 7:30 pm, it changed a little from time to time but for a long time it was the following

    5:00 Ranma 1/2
    5:30 Saint Seya
    6:00 Dragon Ball
    6:30 DBZ
    7:00 Pokemon

    It was very common for all the kids to talk about the episodes from the day before in school, we eventually also got Fox Kids which at the time had Shaman King, Digimon, and some others, so I got into those even though they weren't really as popular as a whole. At the same time or maybe a bit later Cartoon Network started showing Sakura, Samurai X and a few others that I can't remember right now.

    Other than that I think I started getting more into anime when a friend of my brother lend us his DVDs of Evangelion and Hellsing (illegal copies of course) soon after that we also got to see Cowboy Beebop, and I think that not too long after that I started looking for anime to download and watch, since at the time that was the only real option here for watching anime, other than whatever happened to be shown on TV which has been getting more scarce as time goes by.

    edit: I forgot that at some point Yu Gi Oh came into my life, and even though I no longer play that terrible game, it did introduce me to TCGs, including Magic which I love and I'm still as active as much as I can in competitive tournaments so I do owe it in a way.



  • @bard91 said in The early days of being an Anime fan:

    It was very common for all the kids to talk about the episodes from the day before in school, we eventually also got Fox Kids which at the time had Shaman King, Digimon, and some others, so I got into those even though they weren't really as popular as a whole.

    I remember being "the Digimon kid" in my elementary school full of Pokemaniacs during the height of the craze. I'm not even exaggerating, if I recall there was literally only one other kid in all of my classes that even watched it.



  • @DeweyDTruman I remember the Digimon anime a little bit. I had a friend who was really in to it and Yugioh. He was the only person I can remember being in to either of those series.



  • @michemagius the first Digimon is legit great, I rewatched it a couple of years ago, and it totally holds up, well I can at least say that of the latin american version, the US versions is incredibly bad from the little I've seen



  • @michemagius that's really cool! I like that you came into anime from a different angle as opposed to most our age who came under dragon Ball, Naruto, bleach and one piece (but good job getting into Naruto because Naruto has all the feels). Have you ever tried watching beyond the boundary? It has a cool premise, nice bit of romance and looks really nice and also has some light comedic moments, I got into it around that time in 2015-16 when sword art online was huge and so every studio was adapting every light novel it could into an anime (norgami, durarara, ryoka no yuusha). It's one of the good ones!



  • @JamboHyland95 I haven't seen Beyond the Boundary but based on your recommendation I'll have to check it out.


  • Global Moderator

    Im not 100% sure how I really got into anime. I mean I obviously watched pokemon, sailor moon, digimin etc that was on TV. I just think I started to really look for anime after I stumbled upon .hack//sign and realized that it anime was so much more. Then I also watched Hellsing and FLCL and a bunch of other "must watch" series. Guess I just really enjoyed it and keep coming back to see more.



  • My first exposure to anime (though I didn't know it by that name) was in the late 80s/early 90s I was 8 or so and I would generally get to rent a movie from the local shop each weekend. I can't remember what exactly they were at the time but I imagine they were dubbed mecha anime such as Macross/Robotech or Voltron or similar. I can't imagine my middle-of-nowhere rental shop having anything particularly rare or interesting back then, but I loved whatever I was watching at the time.

    Early 90s and getting more interested in console gaming I was finding that many of the games I liked originated in Japan and I started connecting the dots and seeing the influences. Around this time Sailor Moon was on TV every morning, along with Samurai Pizza Cats and I enjoyed both, though still wasn't associating them with the term "anime".

    Later on mid 90's I think it was the then SciFi channel had a week every summer dedicated to japanese animation, I remember seeing the Fatal Fury movie there, and I think Armitage III and similar stuff. Somewhere around then I went to EPCOT on a family trip and the Japan pavilion there had a large store with a variety of stuff I had never seen before (my first exposure to gunpla), and subbed/dubbed official VHS releases could be found at local stores like Media Play and Suncoast. At some point Toonami started. Still played mostly Japanese games, got into JRPGs with PS1, and somewhere around there it coalesced. Later on I studied Japanese in college.

    I don't watch much anymore because young kids/work/life in general takes up most my time. Been picking up most of the Gundam BDs, which have mostly been good. Surprised so much makes it to Netflix.



  • Another person who started watching anime before realizing what that even means. Weird stuff like The Flying House and Adventures of the Little Koala...and maybe a tiny bit of Sailor Moon on Saturdays.

    I didn't really start realizing what it was and getting addicted until around the time of the Fox Kids dub of Escaflowne. I also had a friend in high school who, in speech class, made a speech about how animation isn't just for kids, lol...and he showed clips of Akira, Evangelion, and Princess Mononoke, so I got to borrow a lot of stuff from him.

    It might have been right around when I got into college that Adult Swim started airing stuff like Cowboy Bebop.



  • I was there for the 90's VHS anime boom.

    Had all the classics Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Ninja Scoll, Tank Police, Macross+; as well as some of the less savory tapes that gained the ire of the mainstream press, Wicked City, Doomed Megalopolis and the daddy of them all Urotsukidoji: Legend of the Overfiend.

    I tell you modern Anime fans don't know they're born when back in my day a VHS tape would cost an arm and a leg for two episodes if you're lucky, and have the high likelyhood of the final volume of a series you've been following getting canceled and never getting released over here (at least until Dvd was a thing decades later).

    Too give a taste of what it was like here's a link to the Manga Entertainment promo video that was on all the tapes back in the day.

    Blowing Your Mind Into The 21st Century!

    Ah, the memories come flooding back watching that video.



  • @KimonoNoNo that video is amazing! I hope those groans were in the actual vhs 😂



  • @JamboHyland95 said in The early days of being an Anime fan:

    @KimonoNoNo that video is amazing! I hope those groans were in the actual vhs 😂

    Oh yes every UGHH! is 100% authentic :D

    There's quite a few different Manga Entertainment trailer reels up on Youtube for the curious.



  • @KimonoNoNo Yeah, the anime fans of the 80's and 90's, who lived outside of Japan, had it bad. Just thinking about the fact that Fan Dubs existed during that time and getting them required shipping someone money and a blank VHS so they would make a copy and mail it back!



  • Okay, searching the areas of my mind. I think that watching Voltron in the late 80’s planted the seeds of anime. I can recall some fragments of watching Dragonball but can’t place where. Then there was a long absence.

    Late nineties, early 2000 was the rebirth to me of anime. Pokémon drove some of that but most for me was Yu-Gi-Oh. (I still believe in the heart of the cards.) March 17, 1997 was a glorious day for me when Toonami first aired. So much anime. Even 20 years later, I still watch Toonami because there are still anime that I haven’t seen that they air.



  • My parents split when I was young and my dad would take me to see a movie every Saturday. He would sit through countless cartoon movies as I was too young for more mature films. One Saturday in 1984 we are looking through the paper for a movie to watch and the only thing we see that is a cartoon is in Philadelphia (an hour from my house) but he smiles and say we can go anyway. We drive an hour to see a movie neither of us had heard of and it forever changed my tastes. It was Warriors of the Wind now known as Nausicaa Of The Valley Of The Wind.
    I was enamored and had to know more. Did you catch that year? There was no internet to speak of. Renting videos was barely a thing and Anime sure wasn't available outside of Robotech when that became a thing later. As I grew older I found older fans who would give me raw VHS tapes with no subs. This is how I saw Laputa, Ninja Scroll, and others for years. Eventually I found shops in Chinatown in Philly that had fansubs. I slowly built a small collection while convincing the local mom and pop video store to have an anime section and requesting a ton of titles I wanted to see. Things I had only heard rumors about but they had the access and buying power and I had the knowledge.
    Then the internet happened and more and more I found ways to get access to anime. Sites that would let you download for a fixed fee as long as the title wasn't licensed in the US. This is how I got into Naruto. It had like 30 episodes out when it showed up and I started grabbing it. Then AMVs were the way to find new series. See a few AMVs of a series that looks neat you go grab it. DVDs started coming out and everything got awesome.
    Seeing it as a given to know what anime is in the current culture is amazing to me. I have guys starting at my job who have never known a world without Anime. I was talking about this to a new guy who is 25 and he was telling me how his generation would get into stuff from cartoon network and then see how different the subs were. He couldn't believe about watching raw tapes and just guessing as best you could about the dialogue and meaning. I am turning 40 in a few days and I have been an anime fan for the last 33 years. I can't wait to see what the next 33 years have to offer.



  • @descendfromgrace said:

    Then the internet happened and more and more I found ways to get access to anime. Sites that would let you download for a fixed fee as long as the title wasn't licensed in the US. This is how I got into Naruto.

    Ouch, I hate to hear about stuff like that taking advantage of people since obviously the money wasn't going to the right place and they were probably getting the episodes they hosted elsewhere for free like people in the know could. Rest of your story was really interesting though, especially the part about convincing video stores to carry it. Like where did you get the knowledge of those titles at the time to ask them to carry them? Still was before stuff like Newtype Magazine I'm sure.