Sports?



  • Between one of the most stressful work weeks of my life and Colorado having back to back elimination games, I think I’m gonna go grey before 26.



  • @dipset they had a really good run. Would have been good to see them go through. Sorry for your loss.

    Now onto the Canucks!



  • @e_zed_eh_intern well shit



  • @E_Zed_Eh_Intern I have THPS to remedy the pain...



  • @dipset Borderlands 3!



  • @dipset prob shouldn't feel so bad about losing to the stars now



  • @e_zed_eh_intern

    Unreal. I still think Dallas’ game is grotesque, completely unrefined, and perhaps a bit lucky, but it’s working.

    Tampa Bay is slick, but this Dallas team just punished people. I have no strong predictions for the Cup anymore.

    On a side note - I kinda like all these sports overlapping but now that NFL is on, I care so much less about NHL and NBA. I kinda miss the separation.



  • So I don't want to infiltrate the thread or anything, but I've never had an interest in sports and genuinely would like to know how to be more into them. Does anyone have any memories of how they started out when they were younger, or tips they can think of to help an older outsider get into watching and enjoying sports?



  • @happygaming said in Sports?:

    So I don't want to infiltrate the thread or anything, but I've never had an interest in sports and genuinely would like to know how to be more into them. Does anyone have any memories of how they started out when they were younger, or tips they can think of to help an older outsider get into watching and enjoying sports?

    If you don't like watching the major professional sports, try something a bit more off the beaten path.

    I like watching IndyCar (ovals and street circuits in particular), Olympic-style weightlifting (it can get really tense), triathlon, downhill skiing (Kitzbühel, baby), ski jumping, Top Fuel drag racing, rally racing, darts, and the field part of Olympic track and field (hammer throw, high jump, and javelin in particular). I'm also watching the Tour de France right now, but it can get monotonous outside of the mountain stages (of which the next three are!).

    I like the spectacle of pushing physics to the limits of safety. An exception is the World Chess Championships (which lately is Magnus Carlsen vs. some poor sucker).



  • @dipset Imagine being a Stars fan in Dallas and not being able to get any info about your team playing in the finals because the Cowboys lost on a 4th down gamble again.



  • @e_zed_eh_intern said in Sports?:

    @dipset Imagine being a Stars fan in Dallas and not being able to get any info about your team playing in the finals because the Cowboys lost on a 4th down gamble again.

    LOL! Dude that play was brutal.

    @happygaming said in Sports?:

    So I don't want to infiltrate the thread or anything, but I've never had an interest in sports and genuinely would like to know how to be more into them. Does anyone have any memories of how they started out when they were younger, or tips they can think of to help an older outsider get into watching and enjoying sports?

    It's a tough question to answer because sports are very cultural and your investment in them is likely based on your environment. My mom and dad were very athletic when they were younger, and my Dad especially is a walking talking sports bible. So I grew up watching all of the major North American sports. The ones I enjoyed playing were the more alternative individual sports which was within my personality and really different from my Dad. My Dad was always a bit annoyed I preferred skateboarding and biking to playing football and soccer.

    The point I'm making is that the sports you end up liking or disliking might have a lot to do with your own personality and how it relates to the sport itself. My Italian family really likes F1 and watching Juve play. So I too enjoy that. I really love skateboarding because its this perfect blend of athletics, art, individualism, and being in the moment with friends. I enjoy following skateboarding because every team offers something completely different. For example, a Baker video is equally about capturing the scene as much as it is filming the trick, whereas a Nike SB video is about getting really big technical tricks. Same sport, two completely different approaches to filming AND skating itself.

    #1
    I think my top advice would be to find the person you know who is into sports and maybe watch a game or two with them. They'll show you the ropes and you'll slowly get attached to the nuance of every game, the personalities and such. You also might not like certain games. I know people who love playing hockey but hate watching it. I know people who play and watch golf but don't know anything about anything else. Try a few different sports and try watching a few different sports. My girlfriend is pretty aware of NFL, NHL, NBA, F1, and skateboarding because she's sat down next to me over the past few years and slowly began to understand it all.

    #2
    My next advice would be to dive into some of the documentary style media so you get to know the personalities and history better. Attaching a story and personality to the game is something the TV Networks learned in the Olympics throughout the 80s and 90s and they never looked back. Emotion is like 90% of the battle.

    Basketball: The Last Dance
    Skateboarding: Bones Brigade
    NHL: HBO 24/7
    F1: Formula 1: Drive to Survive



  • @happygaming I'm gonna be punching in my nerd card here real hard, but try some sports anime. Haikyuu made me genuinely interested in volleyball, to the point where I now consider myself a fan of it. Like Dip said, attaching emotions to it helps immensely



  • @happygaming I've found it difficult to get too attached to new teams and sports as I've grown older as so much of my sports identity was formed from an early age. You're certainly not alone though as people undoubtedly pull this off on a regular basis, I'd imagine its simply a matter of getting their perspective. Despite being a massive sports fan its hard to communicate how to become passionate about them. I've played soccer since I could walk practically but have been unable to care too much about any club; I never grew up cheering for an MLS or Intl club outside of the US National Team and even with an MLS team coming to Charlotte I don't feel the passion for it all that much. The last time I really was able to attach myself to a new team was when I actually went to college, and the college I ended up attending was different than the one I grew up rooting for. And even then a lot of the schools were familiar so it wasn't some big culture shock of having to learn to appreciate something new.

    At the end of the day I care because I have connections to the teams and sports I like to watch and from playing I connect to the cruel/rewarding nature of actually playing the game. There's nothing quite like the reality and drama of live competition, especially when its paired with a team you're invested in on some level.



  • @happygaming I would also recommend looking up "best (sport name here) plays". Seeing people do insane things always gets me hyped to watch or play more.

    That in mind, you might want to look up players too. Here are a few suggestions for fun to watch players

    Football: Michael Vick, Barry Sanders, OBJ

    Soccer: Ronaldinho, Ronaldo, Cristiano Ronaldo (I love Messi but I think his talent is less overt to the layperson)

    Hockey: Pavel Bure, Alex Ovechkin (skills and hits), Pavel Datsyuk, Jaromir Have, Mario Lemieux, Iguchi Aito

    Basketball: Vince Carter (2000 dunk contest), Derrick Rose (on the bulls), Allen Iverson, Steph Curry, Kenyon Martin

    Baseball: Jim Edmonds, baseball is generally dry but Jomboy Media's breakdowns on YouTube are short and awesome