Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu! & Let's Go, Eevee! (Switch)



  • I don't think I could possibly be less interested in the prospect of playing two glorified mobile ports.



  • 0_1527699478406_1527651533858.png
    Into the trash it goes.



  • "No actual battles with wild Pokemon"...this is the part I never quite understood with Go. Were those left out because of a design choice, or because they couldn't pull it off inside a mobile app? Them still being gone makes me think it must have been a design choice to streamline the process? I don't really get it. Doesn't help that battles in the wild is the one aspect I like most...



  • do u still battle other trainers and gyms though and lvl up throught that?



  • So here's a few things I want to say about Pokemon Let's Go Pikachu/Eevee.

    First, I think it actually makes a lot of sense for this to be a Gen 1 remake (although, looking at it, it seems more like a reboot/reimagining which would be so much better imo). This is because 1) it's been 14 years since they released Fire Red and Leaf Green; 2) for nostalgia it makes a good symbolic starting point for a "fresh start" on the Switch; and 3) it was the next game in the cycle to be remade.

    Second, as for the game itself, there are a LOT of great things announced from this trailer. Having a co-op Pokemon game and removing random battles and replacing them with optional battles in the overworld is like a dream come true. I'm hyped for having Pokemon follow you around again (as well as your partner Pokemon climb on-top of you) Connecting this game with Pokemon Go is really cool for those of us (myself included) who have played this game extensively and were disappointed with it being not much more than a huge collect-a-thon. Making a pokeball-joycon was an ingenious move because A) its a functioning joycon, B) it's a high-tech poke-walker, C) its a Pokemon Go Plus device, and D) its essentially a FULLY FUNCTIONAL POKEBALL!!!!

    Now I'm going to state something that's a little controversial... I'm actually pretty okay with the fact that this game changes how you capture Pokemon. Now hear me out for a second, how did you capture Pokemon before? You beat the shit out them to wear them down and then tried to catch them. This mini-game of trying to catch them from the start depending on how you throw the ball is actually much more immersive (this'd be how this would work in 'real life' if you were in the Pokemon World), and it's actually more fun way of catching Pokemon. Not to mention, it'll force them to change how you train which means you don't have to grind anymore (or have to wade through countless Zubats in caves (see my previous comment about Pokemon in the overworld))! Additionally, they haven't changed the way you still battle, so the primary game mechanics are still around.

    Next, I just want to remind everyone that this is just a half-spin off and the next main game is confirmed for 2019 (and has been in development, so if you dislike what they're doing for these games, you don't have to worry they'll change the formula all that much). For those of you who are interested in this game, but aren't 100% sold on it yet; remember that they haven't shown off everything, only the key features that make this title stand apart, so hopefully we get some more details at E3.



  • @ff7cloud Yes, the trailer shows the typical turn-based battle system with another trainer. Since this is a 'remake' of Yellow, I'd assume that there are still gym matches for badges as usual.



  • @robbobwill Some people online are saying that Game Freak is likely bifurcating the franchise into 2 series: one for casual fans and one for hardcore fans. To answer your question, it seems like this was a purposeful choice to connect it to Go more, but also to make this particular set of games to be "as accessible" as possible for everyone. At least regular combat will exist with trainers, so it's not all bad. Besides, they'll probably revert back on how to catch them the old way, or at least return it as an alternate method for the 2019 game coming out.



  • @darkenraul1 I'm with you on that one. If you think about it, there was nothing fun about battling wild Pokemon, it was a pure grind. They never represented an actual threat, the only challenge came from having to lower their HP enough to weaken them without actually killing them. I understand it's always been an integral part of the game, but let's be honest, it's definitely not one of the best parts.

    Now we don't have all the details about how capturing works, but I'm sure they could make it interesting in its own right. Maybe you need lures, maybe you need to time your throw correctly, maybe different Pokemon require a ball thrown at a different angle, maybe there's a Punch-Out-like back-and-forth between you and the Pokemon. All of which are easily as involving as lowering their HP.

    Again, if this was the next "proper" game in the series, I would be worried too. I also want more depth from my Pokemon games, not less. But this, as a casual spinoff/remake, doesn't offend me, it allows them to explore new gameplay styles.

    There's a lot to love: having any Pokemon follow you (or riding it) in the overworld looks cool, seeing the wild Pokemon walk around in the grass instead of being random encounters is a much-needed modernization. If the combat ends up being dumbed down and simplified, I'll be out, but until we know more I'm keeping an open mind.

    Yes, the game is clearly made to attract the Pokemon Go audience and lure them towards the Switch, they'd be stupid not to. Then, once these guys are onboard, they'll unleash the next core game and sell the 20 million copies it's aiming for. It's a very transparent strategy.



  • @axel I couldn't have said it better myself. One more thing I'd point out is that (from the trailer at least) traditional combat seems the same as before with familiar moves and type advantages.

    I also agree that this game is meant for much more casual players (especially Pokémon Go fans) to introduce them into the "core" series. I actually agree with what a lot of people are thinking which is that they'll keep the franchise split up like this, where we'll have the Let's Go games for casual fans (which will essentially be remakes of past Gen games, so the next one should be Johto) and the main series games for the hardcore fans (so these ones will me a LOT more complex like the last few titles but also remove all the unnecessary handholding and tutorials).



  • @darkenraul1 said:

    nostalgia it makes a good symbolic starting point for a "fresh start" on the Switch

    How can the start be considered "fresh", when it is closely mimicking a game that came out in 1998?

    it was the next game in the cycle to be remade

    no no NO!

    Gen 4 Sinnoh was next in the cycle to be remade. Gens 1-3 have already received remakes in the forms of Fire Red / Leaf Green, Heart Gold / Soul Silver, and Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire. The cycle isn't continuously remaking only Gens 1-3 and ignoring everything beyond it. The only reason this is Kanto is because a majority of the GO players are people who haven't played core Pokemon since Gen 1, many of which crap on anything that came after it without ever giving it a shot, simply because it's "not their Pokemon" that they grew up with.

    Having a co-op Pokemon game

    Local co-op only. Ignore the fact that Nintendo is trying to sell people on an online service soon. Nope, you better GO out there and make friends with local strangers if you don't have family or friends to play with already. Once again Japan not understanding that what works for their culture doesn't automatically fly in the rest of the world.

    removing random battles and replacing them with optional battles in the overworld is like a dream come true.

    Two things lots of casual players aren't considering when they rave about this.

    1. Since Gen 3 Pokemon Abilities have existed in the games that let a smart player tailor random encounters to their liking or disable them entirely, no repel needed. Some games have also had features like shaking bushes and other various things you could use to more easily find the Pokemon you are after in the wild.

    2. There's going to be nothing exciting about going out to find Pokemon now. Instead of getting the battle intro leading to a mystery encounter, you just immediately see the Pokemon, meaning you'll walk into an area and more likely than not immediately know every Pokemon you can get there. While it cuts down time, it also cuts down any mystery that would've existed before. That said, this is a Gen 1 Yellow Remake essentially with confirmed only Pokemon from Gen 1, so I imagine in this case most people would be somewhat familiar with what is on each route already. It could be awful if this became a series staple going forward in areas we're less familiar with though. Also, I know some people enjoy hunting shiny Pokemon, and this is definitely going to make that process so much more tedious as you'll have to find the nearest load zones to reload the areas repeatedly to change up the spawns on the overworld. They'll probably improve on this if they go forward with the concept, but this first attempt is going to leave lots to be desired. Don't expect Pokemon Snap level of environmental immersion.

    how did you capture Pokemon before? You beat the shit out them to wear them down and then tried to catch them. This mini-game of trying to catch them from the start depending on how you throw the ball is actually much more immersive

    How is just chucking unlimited Pokeballs at stuff immediately until you get lucky more immersive than carefully whittling Pokemon down until they're weak enough to be captured by a ball you've invested money into purchasing and holding for just the right occasion? Sure, False Swipe and such trivialized traditional catching in a very bad way, so today most of it is spamming that before using a sleep move and then trying your balls, but the fix for that should be gating those broken moves until postgame, not completely abandoning traditional capture mechanics in absolute favor for GO's motion minigame.

    I think lots of people have said it now, and I agree that a fusion of these two systems would be the ideal immersive experience. Should keep an option to autotoss or lazy toss like the old way and pray to RNG for people playing handheld who don't want to accidentally chuck their Switch, or who simply don't want to use motion controls. Remember Star Fox Zero? Forcing motion controls is never good. However for people open to it, strategic throws could reduce the RNG factor to a Pokemon catch by adding bonus chance for good throws and possibly missing entirely or being swatted away by poor throws or throws against a Pokemon that hasn't been weakened enough yet.

    @Axel said:

    All of which are easily as involving as lowering their HP.

    There's no lowering wild Pokemon's HP in this game. This has been confirmed. You just start tossing.

    But this, as a casual spinoff/remake, doesn't offend me, it allows them to explore new gameplay styles.

    As negative as I'm probably sounding, I still agree with this.

    Yes, the game is clearly made to attract the Pokemon Go audience and lure them towards the Switch

    It's both though. It's also made to get more traditional Pokemon players hooked on Pokemon GO. Niantic wants more profits too, and as cool as the 3-hour battery life Pokeball Joycon thing is, it is also a glorified Pokemon GO wristwatch 2.0 that they've found a clever way to sell to players through the Switch game, who will then feel obligated to give GO a chance cause they already have it, and it unlocks Switch game bonuses. They're growing the audiences for both games simultaneously. Let's GO is very much a console version of Pokemon GO.

    @DarkenRaul1 said:

    and the main series games for the hardcore fans (so these ones will me a LOT more complex like the last few titles but also remove all the unnecessary handholding and tutorials)

    That's very optimistic. After SuMo, I expect way more handholding, railroading, and mandatory tutorials, but if the existence of GO did somehow lead to them drawing a stark line between the two series of games, resulting in no more Gen 1 pandering in core games as well as more player freedom, then that would indeed be the best of both worlds for everyone. Only time will tell, and I can already feel more casual players pushing what they want on the cores games just from discussions like these.



  • @mbun said in Pokémon Announcements: Let's Go Pikachu & Eevee / Quest / 2019 Game!:

    @Axel said:

    All of which are easily as involving as lowering their HP.

    There's no lowering wild Pokemon's HP in this game. This has been confirmed. You just start tossing.

    You misunderstood me. I know there's no "lowering their HP" in this game, that's why I was suggesting other things that could be easily as involving as that, as a replacement. Of course, if all we end up with is a bare-bones ball-throwing sequence with no strategy or skill involved, it will suck.



  • @axel Gotcha. You threw me off with the Punch-Out-like back-and-forth comment. Sounded like damage was being exchanged.

    if all we end up with is a bare-bones ball-throwing sequence with no strategy or skill involved, it will suck

    People will argue throwing the ball well is more engaging or something. Already hearing people say it.



  • @mbun Yeah to be fair I doubt it will be deep. I'm hoping they'll add another layer of skill/strategy to it, because I just can't imagine capturing all Pokemon in the game, from a level 1 Rattata to a level 50 legendary Mewtwo, exactly the same way, by simply throwing ball after ball. But I guess that's how GO works already?



  • @axel theres a little more to it then that but yea



  • @axel Mewtwo and the like (the 3 birds for this game) are called Raid Pokemon, in Pokemon Go these ones you actually have to weaken 1st with your Pokemon before you get a chance to capture them, I'm going to assume it will be the same in thse games.



  • @darkenraul1 That all makes sense as far as streamlining things, but I feel like there are odd implications to removing random battles. The first feeling I get from that is anxiety...assuming the trainers available to battle are finite, there won't be that security blanket of being able to grind a quick level or two outside of town before heading into the next gym. Which then gives me a pie-in-the-sky idea....

    I know it has become a bit of a dirty phrase, but how cool would procedurally generated trainers be? Assuming they're removing random battles, how about instead have random trainers wandering around on the roads that you can challenge whom have a random set of Pokemon set around some kind of average power level for that route? There could still be certain fixed ones like Nugget Bridge or that weird row of trainers (forget if they have a name). Instead of them catching you in their sight, you would just walk up to ones you wanted to fight. I think that could bring a sort of liveliness to the game that could be fun.



  • I feel like if lets go pikachu/eevee had traditional wild pokemon battles there would be nothing to complain about. It seems like such a weird thing to leave out, but I guess they really wanted to go for the Pokemon Go crowd.



  • Immensely disappointed. guess ill wait for the 2019 one



  • @robbobwill I know what you mean with that anxiety thing. I kind of felt the same way until I sat and thought about it and realized that, not only will it be not a big loss, it might actually be beneficial. As Axel put it, wild battles were never "fun" to begin with, and this means we don't have to grind or slog through random battles with crazy high encounter rates in certain areas anymore.

    As to your concern about finite battles, battles haven't been finite since Gen 2 as there has always been a mechanic in place to challenge certain trainers to rematches. However, that might be a moot point. As the Easy Allies noticed from studying the trailer extensively in their stream, there was no EXP bar from the shown battles, so you might not level up from fighting but from some other method. Whether that's from candies and stardust ala Pokemon Go or something else like Super Training from X & Y or something new entirely its anyone's guess.

    I think your idea about randomly generated trainers is a pretty cool idea, but that is definitely not what'll be happening here. GameXplain did a cool side-by side between this trailer and the original Yellow, and the locations are almost one-to-one (even NPC placement was basically identical). This cements that this is a very up-to-date remake than a reboot or re-imagining like I previously thought. It was really cool, check it out!



  • @mbun said in Pokémon Announcements: Let's Go Pikachu & Eevee / Quest / 2019 Game!:

    @darkenraul1 said:

    nostalgia it makes a good symbolic starting point for a "fresh start" on the Switch

    How can the start be considered "fresh", when it is closely mimicking a game that came out in 1998?

    Sorry, what I meant by "fresh start on the Switch" was to indicate it's the "first-home console main game" that is (almost) Gen 8 with new graphics and gameplay etc.

    it was the next game in the cycle to be remade

    no no NO!

    Gen 4 Sinnoh was next in the cycle to be remade. Gens 1-3 have already received remakes in the forms of Fire Red / Leaf Green, Heart Gold / Soul Silver, and Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire. The cycle isn't continuously remaking only Gens 1-3 and ignoring everything beyond it. The only reason this is Kanto is because a majority of the GO players are people who haven't played core Pokemon since Gen 1, many of which crap on anything that came after it without ever giving it a shot, simply because it's "not their Pokemon" that they grew up with.

    Well that's true only if you allow each game to be remade only once. The release order I was referring to went by generations: Gen 1 = Red/Blue/Yellow; Gen 2 = Gold/Silver/Crystal; Gen 3 = Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald/Fire Red/Leaf Green; Gen 4 = Diamond/Pearl/Platinum/Heart Gold/Soul Silver; Gen 5 = Black/White/Black 2/White 2; Gen 6 = X/Y/Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire; Gen 7 = Sun/Moon/Ultra Sun/Ultra Moon.

    So Gen 1 has been remade with Fire Red/Leaf Green, Gen 2 has been remade with Heart Gold/Soul Silver, Gen 3 has been remade with Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire AND Let's Go Pikachu/Let's Go Eevee; so Gen 4 should be remade next with a remake of Platinum probably and then most likely a remake of Crystal to maintain the pattern.

    Although, in all seriousness, they might switch Crystal and Platinum around for remakes since Gen 2 was so much more successful commercially than Gen 4.

    Having a co-op Pokemon game

    Local co-op only. Ignore the fact that Nintendo is trying to sell people on an online service soon. Nope, you better GO out there and make friends with local strangers if you don't have family or friends to play with already. Once again Japan not understanding that what works for their culture doesn't automatically fly in the rest of the world.

    How is local co-op an issue? Local play is something Nintendo has been promoting in Pokemon since Red/Blue. They've been pushing for kids to go out, meet friends, and play together since 1996! The fact that we can now not only play together competitively but now cooperatively is HUGE! This is especially true with so many games these days that don't even allow for local play. Let's turn your argument around, instead of a kid not having any friends, what if the kid has no internet and this was online co-op only? I think it should be both local AND online, but still, this is absolutely nothing to criticize at all.

    removing random battles and replacing them with optional battles in the overworld is like a dream come true.

    Two things lots of casual players aren't considering when they rave about this.

    1. Since Gen 3 Pokemon Abilities have existed in the games that let a smart player tailor random encounters to their liking or disable them entirely, no repel needed. Some games have also had features like shaking bushes and other various things you could use to more easily find the Pokemon you are after in the wild.

    2. There's going to be nothing exciting about going out to find Pokemon now. Instead of getting the battle intro leading to a mystery encounter, you just immediately see the Pokemon, meaning you'll walk into an area and more likely than not immediately know every Pokemon you can get there. While it cuts down time, it also cuts down any mystery that would've existed before. That said, this is a Gen 1 Yellow Remake essentially with confirmed only Pokemon from Gen 1, so I imagine in this case most people would be somewhat familiar with what is on each route already. It could be awful if this became a series staple going forward in areas we're less familiar with though. Also, I know some people enjoy hunting shiny Pokemon, and this is definitely going to make that process so much more tedious as you'll have to find the nearest load zones to reload the areas repeatedly to change up the spawns on the overworld. They'll probably improve on this if they go forward with the concept, but this first attempt is going to leave lots to be desired. Don't expect Pokemon Snap level of environmental immersion.

    See, I've been playing the last several generations, and have even played semi-seriously in online battles for a bit, and I never knew this about using Abilities to disable random encounters, and I'd hardly consider myself a casual. I can only imagine how few people utilized this when this is a common complaint I hear literally all over the internet. The fact that the default system is being swarmed with Zubats every 5 steps I take wishing I had 99 max repels indicates there is a design flaw in this system. To be honest, I've played a lot of games with random encounters and I hate that aspect of every single one of them. The games that did it smart use semi-random battles (i.e. creatures in the overworld you can either ignore or encounter, but you don't what it is until you engage) like Persona 5 or Earth Bound for example.

    I'll conceed to your point, that Pokemon in the overworld remove the mystery, but this game is perfect for that since everyone knows Gen 1 Pokemon like the back of their hand. I will hold onto my sentiment that seeing Pokemon roaming around in the overworld is immersive (like seeing them in their natural habitat), but idk how we could do that for the upcoming game to keep mystery while having this cool feature. Maybe Pokemon won't appear in the overworld until you see them once, and before then, you'll just see grass rustle like in Gen 5 or something?

    how did you capture Pokemon before? You beat the shit out them to wear them down and then tried to catch them. This mini-game of trying to catch them from the start depending on how you throw the ball is actually much more immersive

    How is just chucking unlimited Pokeballs at stuff immediately until you get lucky more immersive than carefully whittling Pokemon down until they're weak enough to be captured by a ball you've invested money into purchasing and holding for just the right occasion? Sure, False Swipe and such trivialized traditional catching in a very bad way, so today most of it is spamming that before using a sleep move and then trying your balls, but the fix for that should be gating those broken moves until postgame, not completely abandoning traditional capture mechanics in absolute favor for GO's motion minigame.

    I think lots of people have said it now, and I agree that a fusion of these two systems would be the ideal immersive experience. Should keep an option to autotoss or lazy toss like the old way and pray to RNG for people playing handheld who don't want to accidentally chuck their Switch, or who simply don't want to use motion controls. Remember Star Fox Zero? Forcing motion controls is never good. However for people open to it, strategic throws could reduce the RNG factor to a Pokemon catch by adding bonus chance for good throws and possibly missing entirely or being swatted away by poor throws or throws against a Pokemon that hasn't been weakened enough yet.

    Well you never have unlimited Pokeballs, and the idea of actually throwing something (i.e. the joycon or Pokeball Plus) to capture the Pokemon is what's immersive (that and the idea of creeping up on a Pokemon and trying to catch it from the start and not sicking your own tamed animals at it first). Will it get old? Sure, but the website says you can catch them using button controls if you want.

    I will agree with your sentiment though, that it should be either a fusion of the two OR the ability to choose between the two as you said. I'm defending its abandonment because it was never "fun" for me to just fight wild pokemon (either to catch or grind), but that said, I think mixing battling with this capture system might be the best fusion of the two, and I doubt that the next game will remove wild battles when so many people are screaming at Nintendo to bring them back. I am curious to see how this works/feels though to see if it will get a positive enough reception to be incorporated in the 2019 game in some way

    and the main series games for the hardcore fans (so these ones will me a LOT more complex like the last few titles but also remove all the unnecessary handholding and tutorials)

    That's very optimistic. After SuMo, I expect way more handholding, railroading, and mandatory tutorials, but if the existence of GO did somehow lead to them drawing a stark line between the two series of games, resulting in no more Gen 1 pandering in core games as well as more player freedom, then that would indeed be the best of both worlds for everyone. Only time will tell, and I can already feel more casual players pushing what they want on the cores games just from discussions like these.

    I can understand why you'd feel that way after that. But maybe the reason why I'm optimistic about this is because it feels like this game is specifically designed for casual players and the next game was announced specifically to returning fans. It shouldn't be an assumption that we cannot have dark and serious story lines especially after Black/White, and it shouldn't be an assumption that we cannot have a Pokemon game without handholding (even tho most of them have it). Fingers crossed this separating of the series into 2 from this point forward will make both casuals and hardcore fans happy.