Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4/XBO/PC)



  • @neocweeny said in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4/XBO/PC):

    @sheria said in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4/XBO/PC):

    @tokyoslim said in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4/XBO/PC):

    I don't necessarily wish it was easier, but I wish there were actual options available to me at this point. Maybe the game gives you things to experiment with and explore later, but that isn't helping me in this fight. I feel like I'm stuck in the tutorial.

    I definitely think it should of allowed you to use your xp at this point.

    Try going back to Sculptor maybe he will already give you the first skill tree.

    Oh.... Thank you so much ^^



  • @axel said:

    what I really can't stand is when I don't fully understand how a game works, what I'm supposed to do, etc. And those games (Bloodborne at least) are so obscure it becomes off-putting. There's pretty much no tutorial, no easy level at the beginning just to teach you the basics, to at least take you to the first save point and get you started on your adventure.

    Sekiro has some extra penalties for dying lots, so they actually went more forgiving on lots of fronts. There's lots of tutorials at the beginning. They explain most the systems of the game. Text on items explains more clearly what they're for. Falling off cliffs isn't always instadeath. Most fights can be quickly retreated from with your trusty grappling hook. There's still meaningful, tangible rewards for exploration, but it also starts you off in a decent place to start learning the combat system.

    @HoloGraphics said:

    Are the arm attachments as important as quicksilver bullets in Bloodborne?

    Most are very effective against certain enemies. They're not necessary, but they can be extremely helpful when used in the right situations. I'll give the earliest game example I can think of to avoid too bad spoilers. Shuriken obviously you can toss at enemies for damage, but you'll notice bigger enemies usually block them, however those enemies sometimes will wind for a big attack or to recover lots of posture, and if you're not close enough to slash them, then that's a good time to toss a shuriken to interrupt them and keep the pressure up. Also though, if you read the description for that prosthetic, it will tell you that they're extra effective against airborne enemies. Nothing in the game is effective when just spammed, but when used at the right time, none of them are useless.

    @DIPSET said:

    My radar thingy never made a peep so I never noticed it.

    Don't you not get that until later? Been awhile, I don't remember.

    I just kept playing for hours and hours until I reached this Shrine that had a Guardian inside of it. I kept dying and dying and it was becoming so frustrating because I felt like the combat was lacking and the game was waaaaaay too punishing but I kept getting closer and closer and I finally beat the Guardian. It didn't feel very rewarding because as it turns out - it was an average ol Shrine with average rewards.

    I had a completely different experience, where I saw this shrine on a cliffside way out of the way and forced my way to it still pretty early in the game, even as the enemies in that direction were clearly getting stronger as I trudged through. Eventually got there and had to fight a high level Guardian boss, but at this point in the game I had 4 hearts still and my weapons weren't up to par with it, so I had this crazy epic multiple phase fight where I had to keep using all my food to stay alive while I broke all my weapons across it, finishing the fight with no food left at half a heart and just as broke my last weapon across it. The shrine's rewards weren't amazing, but because it was a high level Guardian, I got to loot higher level weapons than I had access to at the time from it, and I enjoyed being able to pull those out when things got dire in other areas. Then every other boss fight in the game was super lame compared to that, because the game let me get so overpowered before them.

    @TokyoSlim said:

    This is literally the very first dude right after you get the shiruken arm upgrade.

    Is there a fog wall behind him? Unless there is one, you don't have to fight him immediately to progress.

    So I use my sugars, does the game just give you tons of them or something? Do I pop both of them? Do they stack?

    A fair amount, but not what I'd call a ton. They don't stack, so only choose one of them at a time, and I wouldn't use it until you're closer to beating him and just need that little extra boost.

    He re builds his poise often.

    The more you damage an enemy's vitality, (health) the slower their posture recovers during fights. So some enemies you have to wittle their health down carefully first before rushing them for enough posture damage for death blows. You'll be able to tell when it isn't emptying too quickly.



  • Hm... Some parts are frustratingly hard. Some parts are okay. Should I feel satisfied with myself for just now beating Lady Butterfly on my first try? Most other bosses have not been that easy for me, not by a long shot. The mini-boss right before her also went down with one try. The guy on the covered bridge with all the armor was very annoying. I only killed him by performing a QTE when he was at the edge of the bridge, which caused him to back up slightly and fall to his death.





  • Also:



  • @bam541 Every game lol



  • I finally beat the very first miniboss. After like 35 attempts.

    I don't want there to necessarily be an easy mode - but I would like it if for example, that giant cliff behind him would have come into play for someone besides ME. ( I fell in that thing like 5 times trying to jump kick off his head). As far as I can tell, it's impossible to have him slip. You can see in this attempt how he's right at the edge and I've got him staggered, but he's held up by an invisible wall. I guess it's just things like this that frustrate me a little, sure it's hard - but the enemies also don't seem to play by the same rules as I have to.

    Youtube Video


  • Global Moderator

    @TokyoSlim You actually can't fall off most edges by just walking off them either, you have to jump or be thrown.



  • @kristen-rogers Hm that's interesting. Does that include dodging? I'm pretty sure I've dodged right off that ledge before.

    Also, would be nice to be able to throw someone. Is that something that's unlocked later?



  • Since I'm nearing the end (I think), thought I would chime in some general thoughts. Regarding the difficulty, I think it's just right. Sekiro has challenged me every step of the way, but never suffocated me with a feeling of insurmountable dread.

    Honestly, it reminded me of my time playing Metal Gear Rising. I crawled my way through in that game until making it to the "come back when you can actually parry" Wolf boss and couldn't proceed for a full day. Eventually, something clicked and I was finally able to develop parrying skills. By the end of MGR, I really felt accomplished and skilled.

    One minor pet peeve is the reused bosses and minibosses. This isn't really a new thing for FromSoft games, but it seemed kinda ridiculous this time around. On average, the bosses are okay to pretty good. Only two of them so far have felt truly special.

    I was very concerned about the Dragonrot mechanic, but it actually isnt much of a big deal. Just spend your money/buy coin purses as well as reaching the next skill point level before studying a boss and you are good just dying without reviving until you have practiced a fight enough to employ the revives.

    The environments and exploration are the real stars of the show for me. Discovering some awesome treasure or a hidden area always get me pumped. I absolutely love the Prosthetic Tools even though I barely use them. My last thing to say is that the Japanese voice cast really nailed it. I will try out the English audio for my New Game Plus playthrough, but I'm really happy FromSoft made Japanese the default audio option.


  • Global Moderator


  • Global Moderator

    I've put about roughly 17 hours into the game and I'm loving it.

    Initially and especially without a shield, you feel the need to dodge but after a while you really begin to realise that dodging is taking nearly as much of a backseat as shields did in Bloodborne. On top of that, you'll get by most of the opening areas just attacking or stealthing your way through but it's not until you face a miniboss or boss that you really get into the groove of what the game wants from you. Constant aggression.

    I love that for the tougher enemies, it's not really the health bar that matters at all, it's how much close their stance is to breaking. So dodging or backing off is nearly always a bad idea unless you're really low on health, your stance is about to break or your still getting an idea of the attack patterns.

    Other than that it's been a blast to just jump around. Makes the game feel huge and just adds so many places to explore. And like with all From type games, going through an area to find it ends up somewhere you've been is always very cool.

    Now... back to Sekiro!



  • One tip I've got that I've really put into play for people struggling with bosses is approach it almost like catching a Pokemon (weird, I know). Playing defensively, while opportunely damaging the enemy HP until its at least at 50% or so before switching to an offensive battle worked wonders for me. The posture damage increases so much past that point, that you should have no problem making it to the deathblow.



  • If something is too hard skip the boss and do something else.



  • The branching paths really get me. I always want to complete everything before moving on. I've now discovered three different entrances to the Abandoned Dungeon. The third one I found was releiving because its clearly the proper entrance and I just missed it. I took a back route that opened up after fighting a mini-boss that was standing guard in the cave where you first start the game. After entering that path, I was quickly dismantled by "Fear" damage which works the same as Curse did in Dark Souls - instant death but without the half health.

    Point being, its really cool how well everything loops, twists, and turns, and its cool that there is a clear "right" way if you eventually find it. Reminds me of the Catacombs in Dark SOuls. Sure, you can run right in there, but you prob don't wanna start there out the gate.



  • By far one of my favourite aspects in video games is thoughtful world design and sense of scale, growth, and progression within that world. In Batman Arkham Asylum, you slowly unlock new parts of the asylum as you progress and find secret connecting paths to old ones. In God of War, you progress though the labyrinth on Kronos' back unlocking areas that eventually loop back around to familiar locations you fought through hours before.

    No game has done this to the degree in which I appreciate Dark Souls. You'd see a distant area that seems so far and unreachable but you will eventually get there and conquer it. Once you conquer the Gargoyles you can look around the Undead Berg and see all of these areas you just fought through, overcoming so much. If you look down you'll see the Forbidden Forrest. You'd think it's just background decoration until you discover you can actually go down there and look back up at the Undead Berg. It was unbelievable to me playing for the first time! Eventually, you'll end up in Anor Londo and the 20-40 hours beforehand feel so small and insignificant when they felt so big up to that point.

    My point is that playing Dark Souls for the first time really brought a lot of emotion out of me and a large part of that emotion was from the visual guide of triumph and exploration you receive by championing a new area and visually looking back at the old ones like they are ancient history.

    I'm happy to say that as I play through Sekiro, I am getting a lot of those same joyous feelings I had playing Dark Souls in 2011. Nothing in all of gaming has really scratched this itch for me since I first played Souls but Sekiro is getting there. For example, seeing the smoke signals in the distance then eventually sneaking around the same roof tops they come from. The entire beginning area of the game feels so large and detailed. I've spent around 15 hours in the beginning of the game up to the end of Ashina Castle, but now that I've made it ahead, I can take a moment to...

    Spoiler...look back at Ashina Castle in the far far distance as it makes me feel rewarded and accomplished. It also makes those early areas feel so small when they look so far away now.

    Spoileralt text

    My anecdote is meant to show just how much I value this type of feeling from a video game. It's so hard to achieve and I don't know how to properly articulate what a studio did to actually give me this type of satisfaction but these are the types of memories that stick with me better than anything else in video games.



  • How do you do the charged downward slash move? I only know the charged stab move.

    update: nevermind, i got it



  • @dipset said in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4/XBO/PC):

    By far one of my favourite aspects in video games is thoughtful world design and sense of scale, growth, and progression within that world. In Batman Arkham Asylum, you slowly unlock new parts of the asylum as you progress and find secret connecting paths to old ones. In God of War, you progress though the labyrinth on Kronos' back unlocking areas that eventually loop back around to familiar locations you fought through hours before.

    No game has done this to the degree in which I appreciate Dark Souls. You'd see a distant area that seems so far and unreachable but you will eventually get there and conquer it. Once you conquer the Gargoyles you can look around the Undead Berg and see all of these areas you just fought through, overcoming so much. If you look down you'll see the Forbidden Forrest. You'd think it's just background decoration until you discover you can actually go down there and look back up at the Undead Berg. It was unbelievable to me playing for the first time! Eventually, you'll end up in Anor Londo and the 20-40 hours beforehand feel so small and insignificant when they felt so big up to that point.

    It was Ico that first really did that for me.



  • @sheria

    I still need to try Ico since I loved TLG and SotC so much. I think the first game where I realized I loved world connectivity was God of War. I only played it in 2006 or 2007 so Bioshock happened right around the same time and gave me that same feeling. I think I also tried The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay when the remaster released in 2009 and that had some of those elements too.

    I never get tired of it.



  • I just beat the game! The final boss was tough but satisfying.

    Overall, I'm not sure what I think about the game on this initial play-through. I like it, but I don't think it measures up to either Dark Souls 3 or Bloodborne.