Censorship topic (out of the news thread)



  • @hanabi This isn't only censored on PS4



  • @iboshow apparently it is. There is a similar scene with lady that is on all







  • Resurrection



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  • @dmcmaster said in Censorship topic (out of the news thread):

    Youtube Video

    To be honest, I called that. Feared into a corner by a current, short lived, social climate. I'm sorry, but I don't see how encouragement for women to come forward to report sexual harassment has anything to do with videogames. You could attempt to try and paint some big picture about how it's all intricately involved, but it just speculation at its finest.


  • Banned

    @sheria You don't see how the objectification and exploitation of girls has to do with rampant sexual harassment in the workplace and rape culture in a broader sense?

    In other news, Mortal Kombat 11 is being blocked from sale on Steam in Japan thanks to excessive violence.



  • @el-shmiablo said in Censorship topic (out of the news thread):

    @sheria You don't see how the objectification and exploitation of girls has to do with rampant sexual harassment in the workplace and rape culture in a broader sense?

    There's a place for objectification on both ends, be it Showgirls or Magic Mike, both examples have more than their place in entertainment. Women enjoy seeing hot men and men like to see sexy girls, that's just playing to nature.

    Do I think any of the recent examples of censorship have any correlation with ongoing sexual harassment? Of course I don't.


  • Banned

    @sheria In the case of Show Girls and Magic Mike, both products deal with the topic of sexual exploitation because that is the subject matter. Of course a movie about strippers is going to have strippers in it. Side note: The ratios of objectification are very out of whack. Perhaps if men were sexualized nearly as much as women are in media you might have a point, but as it stands they aren't, and you don't.

    And of you really can't see a causal link between the normalization of oversexualization and objectification of women in media and how it relates to the treatment of women, well, I'm not sure I can help you there because I'm not certified to deal with that level of delusion.



  • I'd have to raise delusion as well then I'm sorry. Maybe if there's some good hard proof its out of whack, you'd be happy to provide it.


  • Banned

    @sheria Certainly.

    This is fromthe film study Men Talk and Women Show Skin

    "female characters were more likely to wear sexy, provocative clothing than males (26% vs. 5%) or to appear partially naked (24% vs. 8%).

    29% of teen girls were called attractive by another person in the movie vs. 18% of women ages 21 to 39 and 8% of women 40 to 64.

    The study also found that 29% of teen girls were called attractive by another person in the movie vs. 18% of women ages 21 to 39 and 8% of women 40 to 64.

    Marc Choueiti, the project administrator, commented that this sends a message to teen girls that they are "eye candy": "the data speaks to an overemphasis on beauty, thinness and sexualization of women at younger and younger ages."

    This is further compounded by the fact that there is a gross deficit of females in prominent roles in general.



  • @el-shmiablo I hear all you're saying, but it really is no different than saying excess violence in media leads to people acting more violently and increased murder rates. In a vacuum, that'd probably be true, but we live in a society where things like parents / other role models and societal decency laws exist to educate and influence these kinds of outcomes. Some people may still choose to ignore those things and behave as they will, but it then falls upon them to deal with the repercussions of such. It is very hypocritical to be okay with violent media existing and only shun the sexual media. You can say both are bad for people, and you might be right, least when not accounting for things like self discovery and declining birth rates in some countries which some fear will someday undo our species, (although right now there's an excess of people) but I tend to never see people trying to end violent AND sexual media. Usually instead they're slanted toward finding one normal and the other abnormal due to the society and groups they were raised around, and it instead becomes a game of wanting less of what makes them uncomfortable and more of the one they've become used to through repeated exposure.

    Also, as for this study you cite, I don't think it is any secret that humans were wired to find younger women more attractive than older ones. If you went to the grocery store, you'd probably want a fresh banana over one that's closer to spoiling. Biologically we'd look for mates who still are capable of providing many children over ones approaching no longer being able to do so, and that's almost ironically wired into us even in the current day when many people don't even want children and look for a much wider spectrum of traits in their partner. Heck, if we didn't have laws to protect younger people until they have more time to mentally grow and prepare to make big life decisions like having kids, biology would dictate going after even younger mates as people sexually mature way before they turn 18 or whatever the magic age your local society has decided is okay for its residents to delve into sexual matters. So people calling teen girls attractive in movies I'd argue is simply hard-coded human nature, but the fact that exceptions and such exist today and grow increasingly common shows the changes in how we live now are slowly curving us towards older partners that make more sense for our extended lifespans and varied wants in a partner.

    Although I do think there should be some sense of responsibility from the people making the movies to make sure older people aren't the ones labeling them as such unless the movie specifically makes it known this is bad, since that is not acceptable behavior in the cultures we live in and sends the wrong messages much like men sexually harassing women in television and movies in the 90s and earlier being treated as a joke and acceptable was awful and led to those behaviors. Those are the things that need to stamped out, not dictating to people how they're allowed to dress, despite what makes them feel comfortable and others less so. You wouldn't tell a man he's not allowed to wear traditionally labeled female clothing while trying to stamp out media in which this is displayed today, and this is no different. At the end of the day, it is up to the individual, but the harassing behavior to people dressing as they choose is what there's absolutely no place for. In trying to curb harassing behaviors, you don't want to damage sexual independence and knock women back to the time when a man gets to choose how they dress and act. We're all living our own lives and get to decide these things for ourselves.

    This is further compounded by the fact that there is a gross deficit of females in prominent roles in general.

    That's a whole different societal issue that needs to be worked on. Also, we need to get past that point where when it happens people act cheekily about it instead of treating it as normal as they do for males in prominent roles. Blowing the whistle about it undoes much of the good of its existence, because it still stamps in people's brains that it is abnormal.



  • @el-shmiablo MK11's also banned here in Indonesia, which sucks. Rumors say that it's because of a costume for one of the characters that has the hammer and sickle logo, which is viewed sensitively here. Oh well.

    Same goes for Ukraine, although I don't know why they banned it there.



  • @el-shmiablo said in Censorship topic (out of the news thread):

    @sheria Certainly.

    This is fromthe film study Men Talk and Women Show Skin

    "female characters were more likely to wear sexy, provocative clothing than males (26% vs. 5%) or to appear partially naked (24% vs. 8%).

    29% of teen girls were called attractive by another person in the movie vs. 18% of women ages 21 to 39 and 8% of women 40 to 64.

    The study also found that 29% of teen girls were called attractive by another person in the movie vs. 18% of women ages 21 to 39 and 8% of women 40 to 64.

    Marc Choueiti, the project administrator, commented that this sends a message to teen girls that they are "eye candy": "the data speaks to an overemphasis on beauty, thinness and sexualization of women at younger and younger ages."

    This is further compounded by the fact that there is a gross deficit of females in prominent roles in general.

    My apologies, I shouldn't have said "out of whack", because it wasn't your point I wanted proof on. I'm happy to concede that there's an imbalance when it comes to that sort of thing because there's a genuine, biological difference in the genders when it comes to desiring that sort of content. Porn magazines for women never took off because there's just not a viable market for making money there.

    I was interested in proof that all of this censored content had a direct correlation to the inappropriate treatment of women. There's a large difference in natural urges when it comes to men and women, it's seen in just about everything. The material that gets made is simply catering for that difference, it's not a chicken and egg situation here.