Last game you finished



  • Onimusha 2

    I don't know about this one. In some ways it's a sequel in the way I'd want. It's less derivative than the first one is of Resident Evil, with a larger diversity of environments and a more slap-dash story progression (there are several times Jubei jumps on a giant mechanical animal and is transported to a different area). There's also a home base at first with friendly characters you can trade items with; it's pretty cool. Unfortunately the game gets rid of that about a third of the way through. It also reuses a lot of the map from the first game, and (I don't think) makes many innovations to its gameplay or provide enemies that pose much of a threat. The shield guys that could grab you in the first game were fun, but now you can block or stunlock everything other than the bosses.

    I thought it was more confused than the first game.

    5/10



  • NiGHTS Into Dreams...

    At first it's pretty delightful, tracing loops and not really having an idea of how its scoring works. The little diversionary minigames/perspective flips that pop in every other level; the catchy music. Once it finds its shape as a short, lap-based collectathon with pretty limited movement and sense of space, it becomes a lot less interesting. It felt like a novelty; an attractive one, but it falls short of the wonderment that it's reaching for. Still better than Sonic Team's games featuring the hedgehog though.

    6/10



  • The Last of Us Remastered and Left Behind DLC - I always heard friends and critics praise this game. Then after witnessing its overwhelming support that it received in the recent EZA Community top 20 of 2013 (Shout out). I decided to return to where I left the game over 3 years ago. I was originally only about 2 hours into the game. After getting over the combat and stealth hurdles that forced me to stop playing back then. I eventually settled into a flow and even enjoyed some sections of combat by the end of the game. The thing I liked most was the journey itself. Exploring the different city's through different seasons was the coolest part for me. That's something I also found most amusing in Uncharted 4. The Last of Us certainly has a well told story with fascinating characters. Even though I have had it spoiled for me many times by friends who absolutely love this game. I'm just glad I finally finished it so those friends can stop bugging me to play it. Now I only have to hear about how great Shadow of the Colossus is until I finally beat it or until the end of time. For now. I'm Looking forward to finishing The Last of Us Part 2. Much closer to when it launches this time.

    9/10

    Shout out and my condolences to Huber.
    Youtube Video



  • Outer Wilds, I was already enjoying the game but the ending made it even better.

    It's a great adventure/exploration space game that constantly keeps you engaged by the way it feeds you information. I feel like very few games accomplish the feeling of discovery like this game does because you earn every bit on your own.



  • Night in the Woods. A fantastic and strange game, but one I can't really recommend due to all its problems

    I don't think I've played a game where the writing is so hot and cold. Its characters are fun and it tackles themes that nobody else does with a grace and level of understanding that is so dang admirable. But then it has characters who act like they learned how to speak from watching Juno hundreds of times, and the tone is never quite sure if it wants to be Twin Peaks or Scooby Doo, and there's all this setup without any sort of payoff, and then the game just ends almost out of nowhere

    It's a very deliberately paced game which is not an inherently bad thing, but you need to commit to either "slice of life" stuff or a tension buildup to an exciting climax, and the game doesn't do either. Left a bad taste in my mouth



  • @shoulderguy

    Despite how much I love The Last of Us, after beating it 5+ times, I'd say that the first two hours are extremely flawed. I love Naughty Dog's output the past 10 years and I highly appreciate the cinematic style they bring into video games, but I think the amount of walk-n-talk during the first 2 hours of TLOU is exactly the kind of thing they should avoid in the future (and did avoid in Uncharted 4). There was just too much boring stuff like moving planks, talking with Tess, crawling around.

    I personally find it only picks up at Bills Town. Regardless, I'm glad you punched through and ended up loving it. I want more people to get through the beginning because a lot of people quit as you did.



  • @shoulderguy Have you played the DLC for tlou? I actually prefer it over the main game. But I'm not a big fan of the main game, so take my opinion with a grain of salt. Shadow of the Colossus you should definitely go for it, the remake is great, specially if you have a Pro and play it at 60fps. Such s unique game!



  • @phbz I did enjoy the Left Behind DLC same as the main game. Because it's shorter than the base game. It feels more focused and less repetitive. So I can see why people would like the DLC more.



  • Dragon Quest I on Super Famicom. Great game. Use of a guide highly recommended. I played for like 10 hours without one and explored a lot and found a lot of stuff but din't know how to progress the story after a bit. The guide helped and I never would have figured out a lot of stuff without it. Good times though. On to DQ II!



  • Four games over the last two days.

    I replayed Fear Effect 1 and 2, two fantastic PS1 titles that never get old. I also finished Alien Storm on the Megadrive for the first time and then finally tied up the last mission of Assassins Creed Unity. I just bought World End Syndrome for the PS4, so that will be my next game.



  • Played Clock Tower (the 3D, PS1 one), got two endings and overall liked it. It's slow, but I really like the visual design. Though there isn't much attention given to lighting, and it has, even for the PS1, pretty blocky and approximate models, I think it has a pretty attractive and pragmatic visual design. Environments are designed like dioramas, and it creates a staginess that enhances all the absurd trap-door entrances of the Scissorman. There's also really good camera use: ominous pans and cranes---even some nice high or low angles despite how crowded some of the environments are. It's really nice to play something that understands presentation, especially when it feels like even games made today have no idea how to use their cameras.

    Anyways, no it's not great, in fact it's pretty lame when it isn't room-to-room Scissorman hide and seek, but it's got some good stuff going on.



  • @ringedwithtile said in Last game you finished:

    Played Clock Tower (the 3D, PS1 one), got two endings and overall liked it. It's slow, but I really like the visual design. Though there isn't much attention given to lighting, and it has, even for the PS1, pretty blocky and approximate models, I think it has a pretty attractive and pragmatic visual design. Environments are designed like dioramas, and it creates a staginess that enhances all the absurd trap-door entrances of the Scissorman. There's also really good camera use: ominous pans and cranes---even some nice high or low angles despite how crowded some of the environments are. It's really nice to play something that understands presentation, especially when it feels like even games made today have no idea how to use their cameras.

    Anyways, no it's not great, in fact it's pretty lame when it isn't room-to-room Scissorman hide and seek, but it's got some good stuff going on.

    Nice. I just beat that game again too!



  • Ape Escape 2

    The first Ape Escape is a bit forgettable apart from its character design, and I remember it more as a showcase for a two-analog controller than an exemplary 3D platformer. The sequel here pushes forward the personality and structures a more memorable, presentation-laden experience with gatcha and more varied theming.

    Problem is, it still doesn't play all that well. Jumping feels bad. The gadgets often feel like keys rather than tools, and the level design is very obvious, built for slow rather than exciting or free means of traversal.

    I liked it well enough to play it all the way through, but I don't know if it was worth the surprising amount of time it took to get the proper ending.