Contentious Videogame Opinions



  • @dipset
    Like I said it's a franchise that on paper should be right up my alley, but it's just the overall characters or lack thereof that is my biggest issue, I just want some characters that show a slight intrest in the Mexican cartel leaders daughter's Quinceañera or something.



  • Anybody think PS4 exclusives are too serious and not fun enough? I mean besides Spider-Man, Dreams, LBP3, Ratchet & Clank and Uncharted 4 to an extent-most American-produced PS4 exclusives involve serious characters in serious situations where everything has to be serious. I hear Ghost of Tsushima is serious, I know God of War is very serious, Horizon: Zero Dawn is pretty serious, and the themes surround Days Gone and it's dullard protagonist Deacon St John is serious too-oh and of course both The Last of Us and The Last of Us Part II are very serious as well besides the short-lived glimmers of fun to be had. I think triple A videogames are largely moving away from the fun aspects of videogames and replacing that fun with grinding and multiple hours of gameplay in an open-world setting.



  • @jdincinerator said in Contentious Videogame Opinions:

    Anybody think PS4 exclusives are too serious and not fun enough?

    I think that's a problem with AAA western games in general, but yeah. The only big title that's even remotely interested me this generation is Spider-Man. I mostly just play either indies or Japanese games at this point as far as new releases go because they know what I want.

    Youtube Video



  • I would replace serious with dramatic. Like, God of War is still God of War - a bat shit story about killing mythological monsters and hunting down God’s.

    And Horizon, as far as I know, is pretty light hearted at the beginning. Reminds me of a Disney’s Hercules or Mulan tone. Dramatic but not super tense. Again, robot dinosaurs aren’t thaaaaaat serious.



  • @dipset
    I feel people mix dramatic and serious with one another far too often.



  • @jdincinerator While in the end God of War brought me to tears with its beautiful ending, I found that there was quite a lot of levity throughout, from Kratos reducing Norse and Greek myths to their simplest forms for Atreus, to the quippy talking head, to the blacksmith brothers who hate eachother.
    I also think you're focusing on just the biggest games in their catalogue, without mentioning stuff like Concrete Genie, Tearaway, Wipeout, Until Dawn, etc.
    Also, if you take into account third party exclusives like Persona 5 and No No Kuni, you have a pretty varied tone across the board.



  • @jdincinerator I think the higher profile PS4 exclusives that Sony has developed, do try too hard at being serious and to maintain a certain optic to make them look cool to a general audience, at the cost of creativity and forced open worlds and progression systems, aka an incredibly common problem for current AAA games.

    The only one I've played all the way through, Horizon, I thought had some pretty good things, but I also found it to force things that didn't fit well and well clearly not designed as consciously, as if they were added only to check boxes in the AAA release list, and it is succesfull so I can't say they are mistaken by doing that, but I know I personally don't enjoy it and think it isn't particularly good for the industry.

    Thankfully there are plenty of sources doing actual cool things outside of the AAA space, like Somnium Files which I'm playing right now and feels like a great way of continuing what the Zero Escape games did.



  • @el-shmiablo I was referring to the big triple A games with the most attention-Until Dawn, Tearaway and WipeOut aren't really of the triple-tier. I wasn't talking about Japanese games-I'm talking the big American triple A exclusives.



  • @jdincinerator I would just say this is not an American thing only, really more of a thing with the big western publishers.



  • @jdincinerator I'm not sure if in fact this is the dominant trend of AAA games, but I agree with some of the broader points. I think there is a threshold where a game being too serious makes me uninterested. So, if an "action" game has:

    1. A very grounded setting, and
    2. A narrative that wants to be taken seriously, and
    3. Main characters that are generally unspecial "everymen" (no elevated innate abilities, and no skills or competencies derived from their professional role)

    It starts to become too much. (At least, I'm starting to notice a pattern like this, even if my preferences don't completely follow a rule.) This is probably why I've been uninterested in every zombie game, but I love Resident Evil.

    I wonder how much this preference is because games used to be fairly devoid of these attributes. When it comes to movies or "narrative games" (walking sims, etc.), these attributes are unrelated to my preferences. Firewatch would be an example of the latter that I liked.

    (I also can think of many well thought out reasons why AAA games want to jump on the serious bandwangon, but this thread feels like a place where someone can take the piss out of stuff and not be neutrally sympathetic to the opposite view.)



  • @chocobop I don't remember which video it was but not too long ago Jim Sterling made a point where he addressed a lot of what you are mentioning in a great way.

    It was more than just this, but at a base level it talked about the conflict of making a game with the target of very high profits, and the artistic vision that founded the game.

    Don't remember the whole argument and I don't know that the points he made are completely accurate or valid, but I personally have little problem believing something like that, where after all is not different to the general clash you see in consumer media with for example big blockbuster and the most criticallly acclaimed films.



  • Loose thoughts here, but I generally find that the strongest stories have relatively grounded characters. I wouldn't disagree that modern Western AAA games should diversify their lead characters to get a broader range of grounded everyday hero-type's, but I find almost all of my favourite films and novels have that deeply rooted and mapped out relatable characters and settings. Even something like "The Sun Also Rises" by Hemmingway has fashionable bourgeois characters that I don't share a common lifestyle with, but I can relate to their struggle to find some purpose in their day-to-day lives and careers. Point being, I think they can keep the trope but diversify into more variations of a grounded character.



  • @bard91 said in Contentious Videogame Opinions:

    @chocobop I don't remember which video it was but not too long ago Jim Sterling made a point where he addressed a lot of what you are mentioning in a great way.

    It was more than just this, but at a base level it talked about the conflict of making a game with the target of very high profits, and the artistic vision that founded the game.

    Don't remember the whole argument and I don't know that the points he made are completely accurate or valid, but I personally have little problem believing something like that, where after all is not different to the general clash you see in consumer media with for example big blockbuster and the most criticallly acclaimed films.

    Do you happen to remember the video in question? To me, I am just thinking about what might cause me to be uninterested, and not so much what industry forces leads various attributes (like a grounded setting, etc.), but I am curious since you mentioned these things being addressed in a great way.



  • @chocobop said:

    but I love Resident Evil

    Resident Evil definitely doesn't take itself too seriously.



  • Would it be too mean to say that remade RE3 is just a haphazard reskin of remade RE2 with the obvious differences intact?



  • @bard91 The dominant trends of triple A games are numerous and probably share equal grounding such as the advent and necessity of Battle Royale in multiplayer games, the growing need for games to have huge vacuous open-worlds, and maybe the lootbox craze really took off and obliterated the triple A landscape for a good while, oh and maybe the obsession with live service games that are never truly finished products. More than any other generation this one has been the most grotesque and alienating-of course this doesn't really count Nintendo because their games are usually always polished and colourful and fun. And what really underpins many of these games are that they aren't fun-as Regie Fils-Aime says "If it's not fun, why bother?"



  • Vaan is a completely fine character.



  • Sunset Overdrive is wayyyy better than Spiderman Ps4.



  • @naltmank
    Vaan from Final Fantasy 12?



  • @dmcmaster and its critically important sequel, Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings