Metroid Dread thread



  • @phbz I agree with this. Eventhough I love the series, this just a leftover from the Nes era. It really brings nothing to the table in Dread other than a slight annoyance.



  • @yoshi

    As I've said, the game is competent enough dealing with that poor design decision. Just not a fan, personally. Not a deal breaker anyway. Just one more small annoyance that adds up.



  • @neocweeny Yeah, it's a legacy motivated decision and I understand it. Just don't like it.

    Usually not a big fan of secret walls, because I dislike that feeling of compulsion to shoot/hit everything. But if it's for secondary stuff I can deal well with it, I just occasionally shoot/hit stuff and don't care that much about it. But having to deal it it in the main path I share your opinion, I get absolutely nothing from it, just some frustration.



  • hidden blocks and secrets are a cornerstone of the Metroid series. getting rid of them would be like making the Mario series get rid of Super Mushrooms.



  • Honestly, for a non2D Metroid fan like me, it is the doors with slightly different color shields that require different items to break into. Again, it is a thing that is at the core of Metroid's identity, but I also kind of wish they'd retire it or at least tone it down. I like some of the ways they handle it in Dread, like how the Wide Beam one is visually indicated, but lots of the others make me wish the doors weren't so plain door looking aside from the gimmick slapped on them. I just think of other Metroidvanias where obstacles have more variety than six types of slightly tweaked doors. For example, instead of a Missile Door, you could have a boulder that's fallen in front of a door that requires a Missile. Little changes like that would go a long way with me, but I also recognize it begins to step on the series identity some.



  • @yoshi It's more like getting rid of lifes in a Mario game. It doesn't have much purpose in the modern games.

    Like the original Metroid was a maze. I can see why they made it like that. Metroid Dread (and other modern Metroid games) the main path is obvious, when you come to a dead end you know there is a hidden block and you just need to bomb everything to find it, or scan it or whatever.

    I don't have a problem with using it for secrets.



  • @mbun I feel like there are less of them this time. I think the Prime games did it the worst though, not the 2D games. Especially because you always need to switch beams even if you entered the door before.



  • @neocweeny Get rid of lives in Mario is something I really want them to do too.



  • @phbz They did in Odyssey. You just lose some coins when you die now.



  • @mbun Ah, you're right. Played several older 3D Marios this year and forgot about that.



  • Another thing I don't love about it is how generic the areas feel, so far.



  • Well Mercury Steam and Nintendo did have to play it safe with Metroid Dread. if they didn't they risked another Other M situation and pissing off Metroid fans even more than they already were.



  • I think they made some nice improvements. Though. Especially in the map. Even the Hidden blocks are highlighted there once they are revealed.



  • @yoshi This I agree. When you have such an important IP such as Metroid, it's both a burden and a bless to make the next one and developers will always get shit either way. I would love to have a more "progressive" Metroid and in a way it's like with the reactions to the initial showing. Some people were really happy with it while others, like me, were disappointed.

    One a more positive note, I really really like the sound design. This has been a great year for sound/music.



  • https://kotaku.com/metroid-dread-developers-criticize-studio-for-not-credi-1847863848

    Working in Animation, there have been cases where our studio did full service for the entire show (radioplay > concepts > boards > animatic edit > assets > layout > animation > compositing > online edit > post-production) but only get the credit of “Animation Services Provided by: STUDIO NAME”.

    Sometimes we get credit from, say, end credits Cards 3,4,5,6,7 (each card being a different department), and other times we don't.

    I’ve had to unfortunately share a title with someone who received the same credit as me but worked for the client company and didn’t actually work on the pipeline. That made me sad, but I had no recourse to debate it. The client company makes the credits and it wasn't in the contract that I get sole credit for that role.

    In the end, it depends on the production, the service agreement, the publisher, etc. Sometimes you want more people in the credits because the agency who granted the production money might audit and you want proof a worker from X-province or Y-city being credited. Other times you don’t want people in credits so it doesn’t look like you are double dipping across budgets / productions. I would never expect a very short term worker to get credit, but 6 months sounds like a long enough time to get credited.

    All in all, credits aren’t a one-size-fits-all—what is anyways?



  • Saw this on Facebook LMAO

    0_1634278930624_Screenshot_20211015-172005_Facebook.jpg



  • @mbun im not holding my breath. I got the switch oled and I still had some desyncing issues which I thought they already figured out a long time ago.



  • @bigdude1 Joycon desyncing? Probably trying to use them too far from the main system or the old hands completely encompassing them thing that there's basically nothing they can do about without making the antenna a goofy external one or making the Joycon too big for anyone's hands to fully encase. I'd be curious if your Joycon come with the conductive foam inside standard now, but there's no easy way for you to check.



  • @mbun I fixed it with The old Joycon with conductive foam. they needed a stronger antenna. I’ll mess around with it tomorrow to see if i can replicate it consistently



  • i laughed when a friend sent me this meme on Facebook

    0_1634527195181_metroid gaston.jpg